Surrogacy Agency in Maine is committed to assisting our gay and lesbian intended parents build the families they’ve always wanted through gestational surrogacy.

Surrogacy: A Gay Adoption Alternative

In times past, adoption was one of the only options a gay or lesbian couple had to turn to if they wanted to welcome a child into their families and lives. Now, however, there is another option – gestational surrogacy. When you choose to build your family using a surrogate mother, you will find that there are many benefits that you simply can’t gain through a traditional adoption arrangement, and that’s why more and more people in the LGBTQ community are turning to surrogacy.

Gestational surrogacy provides intended parents with the opportunity to have a child that is genetically related to one of the partners. Donor eggs and sperm may also be used, but unlike traditional surrogacy, the child will not be genetically related to the surrogate mother. Having a genetic relationship to the child is certainly one of the main draws of surrogacy, but there are other benefits to choosing this method over adoption, as well.

For example, the surrogacy process takes, on average, 10 to 14 months from start to finish. Adoption proceedings can take years, and those years often take their toll in stress and financial drains. Additionally, adoption agencies have many strict rules about who can and can’t adopt a child, and that often leaves many loving, dedicated potential parents unable to actually bring a child home. When you use a surrogate to have a child, however, you’ll find the process is much less stressful.

If you’re interested in using a surrogate to build your family, we’d love to help! To get started, simply fill out our easy online application, and a friendly Surrogacy Agency in Maine case manager will be in touch with you to discuss your application, answer any questions you may have, and tell you about the next steps in the surrogacy process. In the meantime, we invite you to check out our Gay Surrogacy FAQ.

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